While I love this blog, I now pretty much only write on my other two blogs: BirdingBlogs.com and 10,000 Birds - I would love to see you there!

Tuesday, 5 January 2010

latest video: aperture and aperture priority

I have just finished another "how to" video explaining aperture and aperture priority and how you can make it work for your in photography and digiscoping. I am off to Bodensee (border of Switzerland, Germany and Austria) in 10minutes, but when I get back in a couple of days, I will write a real post about aperture and digiscoping.


If you like the video, PLEASE RATE IT!
go ahead, give it some stars!


happy birding,
Dale Forbes

5 comments:

Chris said...

Hi Dale,
This is a very good video, very interesting indeed for nature photographers!!! And it is so nice to put a face on your name!!! Gorgeous!

Kevin said...

Great info Dale so to achieve that nice blurred background you need a wide aperture setting?

Also I found in harsh light conditions when I narrow out the Aperture it will cut down the burnt highlights a bit.
Why is that sir?

Paul said...

Hi,

Love the blog, keep up the good work! I was trying to find contact details but couldn't so I posted.

We have just finished a new site for use by the birding community:
www.birdingnews.co.uk
We are contacting a limited number of people that we hope will let us know what they think about it before we take it out of beta. If you could let me know what you think that would be great.

We also have an iPhone app out that can be used in conjunction with the site, you can find out more about the iPhone app here:
http://www.birdingnews.co.uk/iphone/

and this links through to the app in iTunes:
http://itunes.apple.com/WebObjects/MZStore.woa/wa/viewSoftware?id=348791972&mt=8

Paul

Dale Forbes said...

Thanks Chris, I will be creating/releasing a whole series of videos on digiscoping, photography and nature in the future.

Hi Kevin, exactly. As you know, for digiscoping, we use a wide-open aperture to get the fastest shutter speed possible. This reduces the depth of field (which is already short because of the huge focal length we are dealing with).
I have been trying to figure out your second question and am still to completely understand that, but here are some interesting links around the subject:
http://graphics.stanford.edu/~mhouston/school/digital-photo/
http://blogs.oreilly.com/aperture/2009/01/highlight-recovery.html
http://photo.net/nikon-camera-forum/009EGv

Hi Paul, I sent you an email after having tested out your website - very cool

Dale Forbes said...

Thanks Chris, I will be creating/releasing a whole series of videos on digiscoping, photography and nature in the future.

Hi Kevin, exactly. As you know, for digiscoping, we use a wide-open aperture to get the fastest shutter speed possible. This reduces the depth of field (which is already short because of the huge focal length we are dealing with).
I have been trying to figure out your second question and am still to completely understand that, but here are some interesting links around the subject:
http://graphics.stanford.edu/~mhouston/school/digital-photo/
http://blogs.oreilly.com/aperture/2009/01/highlight-recovery.html
http://photo.net/nikon-camera-forum/009EGv

Hi Paul, I sent you an email after having tested out your website - very cool